Publikationen aus Bereich Anthropologie

Bulletin sga 21 2015
  • 2015

Bulletin der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Anthropologie

Bulletin SGA 21_ 1 / 2 (2015)
Nachhaltige Nutzung natürlicher Ressourcen: Der Beitrag der Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften
  • 2015

Nachhaltige Nutzung natürlicher Ressourcen: Der Beitrag der Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften

Wie können die Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften zur nachhaltigen Ressourcennutzung beitragen? Diese Frage wurde bei der SAGW-Tagung Nachhaltige Ressourcennutzung – von der Evidenz zur Intervention diskutiert. Im Zentrum standen Fragen zu Werteorientierung und Gerechtigkeit, Einbeziehung von Stakeholdern und Umsetzungsorientierung sowie die disziplinenübergreifende Zusammenarbeit innerhalb der Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften.
Bulletin SGA 20_2
  • 2015

Bulletin SGA 2014 20_2

Jahrgang 20, Heft 2
Developing the Environmental Humanities in Switzerland
  • 2015

Developing the Environmental Humanities in Switzerland: An Evaluation of Opportunities, Challenges, and Priorities in Research, Teaching, and Institutional Support

Solving or mitigating today’s environmental problems requires knowledge from the humanities, social sciences, and the natural sciences. This report focuses on the role of the social sciences and humanities in understanding of past, present and future human-environment relationships and informs about the current state and growth potential of the Environmental Humanities in Switzerland.
  • 2014

Stable isotope analysis of Swiss freshwater fish from medieval and early modern sites.

The evaluation of medieval and modern fish remains can provide evidence on freshwater fish stocks, the ecological condition of their habitats and anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems (organic and inorganic pollution). Therefore, we measured carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope ratios of 140 fish bones.
  • 2014

Quantifying the economic importance of large-seeded wild plants in the Neolithic lakeshore site of Zürich-Opéra (Central Switzerland).

It has long been acknowledged that the preservation of archaeobotanical macroremains of Wild fruits in dry sites are unrepresentative and that the quantification of the economic importance of these plants in the investigated site is hardly possible. On the other hand, the extraordinary preservation of wetland sites allows a unique approach to the consumption of wild plants in Prehistory.